Great Discoveries: Antique Whiskey Bottles Found in New York Home

Great Discoveries: Antique Whiskey Bottles Found in New York Home

You never know what treasures are hidden in a home — consider the story of a New York couple that recently discovered antique whiskey bottles in their house’s mudroom.

The couple, Nick Drummond and Patrick Bakker, found the bottles while renovating the mudroom of their 1914 New York home, according to WTHR. During the renovation, Drummond and Bakker unearthed a package hidden in a pile of straw and hay. The discovery prompted a thorough investigation of the mudroom, which led them to explore a hatch within the room. Here, Drummond and Bakker uncovered more than 70 bottles of whiskey dating back to 1923.

Each whiskey bottle was wrapped in straw and paper, signed with the name R.M. Clark, and labeled “Old Smuggler” Gaelic Whiskey of the Stirling Bonding Company, according to The Daily Gazette. Some of the bottles were full, while others were half-full or empty.

The antique whiskey bottles discovery comes after Drummond and Bakker heard rumors that their home once belonged to a local bootlegger, the couple told The Daily Gazette. Since their discovery, Drummond and Bakker have sampled whiskey from the bottles. They also conducted research into the bottles and found they may have belonged to Count Adolph Humpfner, the home’s original owner.

If you want to add some Old Smuggler bottles to your whiskey bottle collection, WorthPoint® can help. The WorthPoint database includes over 26,000 search results for the term “whiskey bottle,” and we encourage you to use our database to see the sold prices for antique whiskey bottles from around the world.


Dan Kobialka is a self-employed content writer and editor with about a decade of experience. He produces content across a wide range of industries, including antiques, insurance, and real estate. To learn more about Dan, please visit his website: www.dankobialka.com.
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